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Manitoba wary of federal offer to help fund replacement for Greyhound buses

Greyhound announced in July that it would end service on all but one of its routes in western Canada.


WINNIPEG—The Manitoba government says it’s willing to look at a federal plan to replace Greyhound bus service, but it won’t put up subsidies.

Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau announced that the Trudeau government is open to helping affected provinces pay for bus service in communities where other companies have not taken over.

Manitoba Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler says he is willing to look at details of the proposal when they’re made available.

But he said Manitoba is not going to get into the business of running buses.

Schuler says private companies are already planning to fill some of the routes being abandoned by Greyhound, and the federal government can deal directly with remote Indigenous communities where a replacement for Greyhound is needed.

Greyhound announced in July that it would end service on all but one of its routes in western Canada, and in northern Ontario, effective today.

“I know we as a government are not prepared to get into the business of running buses,” Schuler said Wednesday.

“We believe the market will make a decision on what’s feasible and what isn’t.”

Manitoba had hoped the federal government would force Greyhound to maintain its service longer so that replacements could be in place for today, Schuler said.

Some communities, including Thompson, are still putting together plans to find private transportation companies who can revive bus service.

News from © Canadian Press Enterprises Inc. 2016

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