PLANT

Ont. summer industrial safety blitz is on!

Ontario inspectors are focusing on new, young workers.


Safety inspectors are checking to see that new and young workers are properly informed, instructed and supervised on the job.

Safety inspectors are checking to see that new and young workers are properly informed, instructed and supervised on the job.

TORONTO — Ontario’s summer safety blitz is on and Ministry of Labour (MOL) inspectors will be focusing on new and young workers, to ensure they are informed, trained and ready to work safely in industrial environments of all kinds, including plants.

Between 2009 and 2013, MOL reports 30 workers aged 15 to 24 died in work-related incidents and more than 30,000 sustained lost time injuries. Many of these young workers were employed as labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities operations.

The MOL says many of the safety issues are attributed to employers failing to:

• Inform, instruct and ensure supervision of workers, and prepare a written occupational health and safety policy.

• Provide proper safety measures, such as machine guarding devices, eyewash fountains, guardrails and lifting devices.

• Comply with the statutory requirements for workplace Joint Health and Safety Committees or health and safety representatives, and failure to ensure JHSC meetings and workplace inspections take place.

When the inspectors come calling as part of the Safe at Work program, they’ll be checking that new and young workers (14 to 24):

• Are properly informed, instructed and supervised on the job.

• Meet minimum age requirements.

• Follow required safety measures and procedures.

Your plant will be more likely to get a visit if there has been a high a incidence of lost-time injuries among new and young workers; it has been identified as a high-priority workplace (in manufacturing: automotive; food, beverage and tobacco; sawmills and logging); the workplace is known to have highly hazardous processes and equipment; complaints have been received and there’s a history of non-compliance; where new and young workers are often employed on a regular or seasonal basis: and/or not previously visited by the ministry.

Click here for the Guide to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, which explains what every worker, supervisor, and employer needs to know.

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