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Canada loses bid for seat on the UN Security Council on first vote

Second consecutive defeat in a bid for a seat on the world's most powerful body.

June 18, 2020   by Mike Blanchfield

OTTAWA — Canada was humbled on the world stage when it failed to secure a seat on the United Nations Security Council, losing to Norway and Ireland on the first ballot.

The June 17 loss was Canada’s second consecutive defeat in a bid for a seat on the world’s most powerful body, and stood as a stark reminder of the country’s diminishing influence. The defeat of the Liberal government led by Justin Trudeau followed the loss by the former Conservative government of Stephen Harper in 2010.

Prior to that, Canada had won six times in a row, roughly each decade since the creation of the UN, although it lost its first bid in 1946 just months after it contributed to the construction of the organization out of the ashes of the Second World War.

“This must act as a wake-up call to the Liberal government and a message to Canadians: Canada is not doing enough,” said Jack Harris, the NDP’s foreign affairs critic.

“Prime Minister Trudeau announced in 2015 that ‘Canada is back!’ but there is little to show for it.”

Harris cited low spending on international development assistance and the decline of Canadian contributions to UN peacekeeping missions to historic lows – two criteria that were widely seen as essential in winning a seat on the council.

Canada’s latest loss came in the first round of voting Wednesday in a secret ballot of 192 member states of the United Nations General Assembly for two available seats on the council for a two-year term starting next year.

Canada needed 128 votes _ or two-thirds of the voting members of the assembly. Norway passed the threshold with 130 and Ireland garnered 128 votes.

Canada fell short with 108 votes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said even if Canada lost, it would continue its international efforts to fight against climate change, economic inequity and preserving the world’s increasingly fragile institutions.

Norway and Ireland had an advance start in campaigning because Trudeau only announced Canada’s intention to seek a seat in 2015 after the Liberals were elected.

Trudeau dismissed suggestions that a loss for Canada would be a political failure for him personally, given the capital he has invested in the bid – starting with his “Canada is back” declaration the day after he won the October 2015 federal election.

Adam Chapnick, a professor at the Royal Military College of Canada and author of a recent book on the Security Council, said Norway and Ireland had massive head starts on Canada. Both “are legitimate opponents with good records who took the campaign seriously from the beginning and likely had concluded enough vote trades before we even began to campaign, to make a Canadian victory highly unlikely from the beginning,” he said.

“The fact that our campaign was taken off track by the 2016 US election and the threat to NAFTA didn’t help, either. I think the campaign team did a very good job over the last six months but that wasn’t enough.”

Canada’s campaign for the council focused heavily on what it has been doing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. That has included convening like-minded nations to ensure food security in developing countries, keeping vital supply chains open across the globe, and working on new financing models to help struggling countries whose economies have been decimated by the pandemic.

European countries were expected to unite around Canada’s two competitors, which forced the Trudeau government to focus on Africa, Latin America, and Arab nations, as well as the small island states of the South Pacific that face potential extinction one day from rising sea levels caused by climate change.

Trudeau levelled veiled criticism at the UN’s geographical organization that has placed Canada in a grouping against European countries, which can never agree on two candidates for the temporary seats on the council.

“I have nothing but respect for our two competitors, Ireland and Norway, that have demonstrated an engagement in the world,” he said. “It is unfortunate that we’re in a situation of having to compete against friends for this.”

 


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1 Comment » for Canada loses bid for seat on the UN Security Council on first vote
  1. Does this “loss” really affect anyone?
    Focus on the Canadian economy and PLEASE stop buying Chinese made goods.

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