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Plastics recycler ramps up new processing line

Resource Polymers expects to have its wash line for recycled plastics up and running by mid December as it charges up its new processing line.


November 22, 2010
by PLANT STAFF

Resource Polymers plans to handle up to 30 million pounds of post-industrial and post-consumer scrap plastics per year.

Photo: Fox Petroleum

HAMILTON: Resource Polymers Inc. expects to have its wash line for recycled plastics up and running by mid December as it charges up its new processing line.

The Hamilton-based company, a subsidiary of New York-based plastics recycler Fox Petroleum, installed the line in 2009 to wash PET water bottles but stopped using it this year while a new processing line was installed.

“We will be the only firm that I know of with the ability to clean any type of post industrial scrap plastic waste in southern Ontario,” said William Lieberman, president of Fox Petroleum Inc. “We expect the demand for our streamline process of sorting, shredding, grinding, cleaning and extruding any type of plastic compound to have a serious impact on recyclers and municipalities in the region.”

The company said plastics it currently recycles are being turned into new products including new agricultural trays for greenhouses.

Resource Polymers, which has six employees, is processing between 2,500 and 3,000 pounds per hour and intends to handle up to 30 million pounds of post-industrial and post-consumer scrap plastics per year. Sales of close to $5 million are expected.

Dun and Bradstreet estimates Resource Polymers’ current sales to be more than $600,000.

The company recently purchased from bankruptcy a new 20 by 50-in. Cumberland Model 50B Granulator with a 150 hp motor. The new processing line put together with its vecoplan shredder will allow the plant to process up to 3,500 pounds of scrap plastic per hour.

Fox Petroleum said its is “aggressively seeking” additional acquisition targets in the plastics recycling market to increase its processing capacity and looking at plastic waste streams from the automotive and beverage industries.
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