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Kraft "Bullfrogs" its Dad’s Cookies bakeries

Green electricity provider Bullfrog Power is piloting a natural gas project with Kraft Canada that will make its Dad’s Cookies not only delicious, but also green.


February 1, 2011
by PLANT STAFF

Tom Heintzman (left), Bullfrog Power president, and Chris Bell, Kraft Canada’s vice-president of Snacks, have a first taste of bullfrog-powered cookies at the Kraft Canada Scarborough Bakery.

Photo: iStockphoto

TORONTO: Green electricity provider Bullfrog Power is piloting a natural gas project with Kraft Canada that will make its Dad’s Cookies not only delicious, but green.

Not that the cookies are actually going to be green, but they will be made and packaged using Bullfrog’s green natural gas and electricity derived from renewable sources such as hydro and wind.

Kraft makes the Dad’s line of cookies at its Scarborough and Lakeshore bakeries in Toronto.

Toronto-based Bullfrog said its generators will inject 100% green natural gas and 100% green electricity into Kraft’s natural gas and electricity systems to match the amount of gas and electricity used by the baking and packaging processes.

“Unlike conventional natural gas, green natural gas does not increase the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and therefore helps prevent climate change,” says the company in a release.

“The main cause of increasing carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere is the burning of fossil fuels, including natural gas,” said Ed Whittingham, executive director of the Pembina Institute, an environmental research group with offices across Canada. “We are excited that Bullfrog Power is capturing wasted gas from landfills and putting this to good use in our homes and businesses. Further expansion of this product to other biogas sources promises to be an important energy solution that will help address climate change.”

The Dad’s Cookies project will help Kraft lower its energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, which is part of the food company’s strategy to lower CO2 emissions and energy use by 25%, water consumption by 15%, solid waste by 15%, and eliminate 150 million pounds of packaging material by 2011.

More than 8,000 homes and 1,200 businesses across Canada are using green electricity provided by Bullfrog Power.
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