Subscribe
PLANT

$1.24B carbon capture project gets green light

The Saskatchewan government has given a green light to a $1.24 billion carbon capture and storage project that it says will be among the first commercial-scale facilities in the world.


April 27, 2011
by PLANT STAFF

SASKATOON: The Saskatchewan government has given the green light to a $1.24 billion carbon capture and storage project that it says will be among the first commercial-scale facilities in the world.

The demonstration project, which is getting a $240 million infusion from the federal government, will involve a new generating unit that will transform an aging coal-burning power plant at Boundary Dam Power Station near Estevan into a producer of cleaner electricity. Greenhouse gas emissions will be reduced by about one million tonnes per year, which is the equivalent of taking more than 250,000 vehicles off Saskatchewan roads each year.

The captured CO2 will be sold to energy companies for the recovery of oil from mature fields. Captured sulphur dioxide (SO2) will be used in the production of sulphuric acid.

The Boundary Dam Power Station is SaskPower’s largest generating facility with six units and a combined generating capacity of 824 megawattts. The new unit will be capable of generating 110 megawatts.

Montreal-based SNC Lavalin will handle engineering, procurement and construction activities; and Cansolv, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Global Solutions, will supply the carbon capture process.

The government says a state-of-the-art steam turbine, the first in the world designed to fully integrate a coal-fired power plant with carbon capture technology, will be supplied by Hitachi.

Construction is to begin immediately with start-up planned for 2014.

Because of its reliance on burning coal for energy, Saskatchewan is the largest per capita emitter of greenhouse gasses in Canada and one of the highest emitters per capita in the world (more than 70 tonnes per person annually), according to the Saskatchewan Environmental Society.
With files from Canadian Press