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WEB TIPS: A case for case studies

As a successful Canadian manufacturer, you have a track record of achievement but you’re likely reluctant to blow your own. While this reserve is commendable it means you are missing out on a first-rate marketing opportunity that allows you to blow your own horn and preserve a bit of personal modesty: posting case studies on your blog.


September 14, 2011
by ANDREW SHEDDEN

As a successful Canadian manufacturer, you have a track record of achievement but you’re likely reluctant to blow your own. While this reserve is commendable it means you are missing out on a first-rate marketing opportunity that allows you to blow your own horn and preserve a bit of personal modesty: posting case studies on your blog.

Your prospects are not interested in you, your company or your products but they do care about outcomes. What others say about outcomes related to your products or services is the kind of endorsement that will help a prospect make a purchasing decision in your favour.

Simply outline the problem, the solution and the results. Case studies can be very short and still retain their effectiveness. For best results keep them to about 500 words. Emphasize benefits including cost savings, effectiveness and ROI.

Refer to the customer company by name, but you’ll need written permission. Failing that, you have the option of writing an anonymous case study but be certain to remove any detail that could identify the company. It won’t have the same degree of effectiveness but it will be more effective than no case study.

Andrew Shedden is the president of Broadfield Consulting, a marketing consulting firm that makes it easier for companies to grow their revenues. For new media resources and services visit http://www.broadfieldcommunications.com. For free industrial marketing resources visit http://broadfieldconsulting.com.