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Ontario scores B- on regulatory reform

Ontario’s manufacturers can look forward to a little less red tape from the provincial government, according to research by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB).


January 17, 2012
by PLANT STAFF

TORONTO: Ontario’s manufacturers can look forward to a little less red tape from the provincial government, according to research by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB).

It has released national grades for Canada’s governments in its Red Tape Report Card and Ontario is making progress on being accountable for the 386,251 regulatory requirements it places on individuals and businesses, says the CFIB.

The report card evaluates the federal and provincial governments’ performance in the following areas: political leadership, measuring the burden and constraints on regulators.

“For making progress in most of these areas, Ontario deserves a B- for their performance – a big improvement over the C- they got in 2011,” said Satinder Chera, CFIB’s vice-president for Ontario.

The Canadian association representing small and medium-sized businesses estimates that government red tape costs Ontario businesses $11 billion each year.

However, red tape reform must continue, said Chera. “The on-going proliferation of regulations from the Ministry of Labour and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) isn’t helping.”

CFIB says Ontario must do the following in 2012:

• Deliver on Premier McGuinty’s pre-election promise to small business on red tape by making Labour and WSIB regulations a focus for reform;

• Build on Premier McGuinty’s previous commitment to reduce the regulatory burden on small business by 25% by 2011 – commit to a new target;

• Continue to measure and publicly report on the number of regulatory requirements; and,

• Legislate the requirement to publicly report the number of regulations.

CFIB assigns top marks to BC, which recently passed first-of-its-kind legislation requiring an annual report on regulation.

Several provinces and the federal government improved their grades over last year. Nova Scotia’s grade took the biggest tumble, while Manitoba, PEI and the Northwest Territories all received failing grades for making little or no progress.

Grades for the rest of Canada are as follows:

• BC (B+ to A)

• NL (B to B)

• Federal (C+ to B)

• Quebec (C+ to B-)

• Saskatchewan (C+ to B-)

• New Brunswick (C- to C+)

• Nova Scotia (B to D)

• Alberta (F to D)

• Yukon (F to D)

• Manitoba (F to F)

• PEI (D to F)

• NWT (F to F)

Click here for a copy of the CFIB’s Red Tape Report Card 2012.